Advice and Information on the coronavirus situation

Updated 21 December 2020

Leaders is a registered COVID Safe workplace, which means we've lodged a COVID-19 Safety Plan and we're taking appropriate steps to keep our community safe.

There is no face-to-face teaching on campus at Leaders this school year. All courses will be delivered online via Leaders online and Zoom until further notice.

Coming onto campus

Following the recent increase in COVID-19, the Premier has placed a public health order to enforce the stay at home. We are asking all parent's and students not to visit the campus unless it’s essential for you to do so.

If it is essential for you to visit the campus, please follow these instructions.

  • Whether you’re a student, staff member or visitor to Leaders, we ask you not to come to campus if you're sick.  If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 – even if you have mild symptoms, the safest thing to do is to get tested and stay home until you have a negative result.

  • Bring a face mask to wear where 6ft physical distancing can't be maintained on campus. (It is highly recommended wearing a face mask and a face shield in any indoor settings, and public transport where physical distancing is hard to maintain.

  • Wash your hands regularly and practice good hygiene – hand washing is one of the best ways to stop the spread of COVID-19. 

  • Follow our social distancing guidelines – keep your distance, respect others and speak up if people forget to do the right thing.

  • Stay safe as you travel to campus – avoid peak times on public transport wherever possible, and consider walking or riding. 

Important Update: 

What can I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

The following actions help prevent the spread of COVID-19, as well as other coronaviruses and influenza:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

  • Stay home when you are sick.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces every day. High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. A list of products suitable for use against COVID-19 is available here. This list has been pre-approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use during the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.

What do I need to know about washing my hands effectively?

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; and after handling anything that's come from outside your home.

  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.

  • Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

  • The CDC's hand-washing website has detailed instructions and a video about effective hand-washing procedures.

How does coronavirus spread?

The coronavirus is thought to spread mainly from person to person. This can happen between people who are in close contact with one another. Droplets that are produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes may land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby, or possibly be inhaled into their lungs.

A person infected with coronavirus — even one with no symptoms — may emit aerosols when they talk or breathe. Aerosols are infectious viral particles that can float or drift around in the air for up to three hours. Another person can breathe in these aerosols and become infected with the coronavirus. This is why everyone should cover their nose and mouth when they go out in public.

Coronavirus can also spread from contact with infected surfaces or objects. For example, a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

How could contact tracing help slow the spread of COVID-19?

Anyone who comes into close contact with someone who has COVID-19 is at increased risk of becoming infected themselves, and of potentially infecting others. Contact tracing can help prevent further transmission of the virus by quickly identifying and informing people who may be infected and contagious, so they can take steps to not infect others.

Contact tracing begins with identifying everyone that a person recently diagnosed with COVID-19 has been in contact with since they became contagious. In the case of COVID-19, a person may be contagious 48 to 72 hours before they started to experience symptoms.

The contacts are notified about their exposure. They may be told what symptoms to look out for, advised to isolate themselves for a period of time, and to seek medical attention as needed if they start to experience symptoms.

What is social distancing and why is it important?

The COVID-19 virus primarily spreads when one person breathes in droplets that are produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. In addition, any infected person, with or without symptoms, could spread the virus by touching a surface. The coronavirus could remain on that surface and someone else could touch it and then touch their mouth, nose or eyes. That's why it's so important to try to avoid touching public surfaces or at least try to wipe them with a disinfectant.

Social distancing refers to actions taken to stop or slow down the spread of a contagious disease. For an individual, it refers to maintaining enough distance (6 feet or more) between yourself and another person to avoid getting infected or infecting someone else. School closures, directives to work from home, library closings, and cancelling meetings and larger events help enforce social distancing at a community level.

Slowing down the rate and number of new coronavirus infections is critical to reduce the risk that large numbers of critically ill patients cannot receive life-saving care. Highly realistic projections show that unless we begin extreme social distancing now — every day matters — our hospitals and other healthcare facilities will not be able to handle the likely influx of patients.

What should and shouldn't I do during this time to avoid exposure to and spread of this coronavirus? For example, what steps should I take if I need to go shopping for food and staples? What about eating at restaurants, ordering takeout, going to the gym or swimming in a public pool?

The answer to all of the above is that it is critical that everyone begin intensive social distancing immediately. As much as possible, limit contact with people outside your family.

If you need to get food, staples, medications or healthcare, try to stay at least six feet away from others, and wash your hands thoroughly after the trip, avoiding contact with your face and mouth throughout. Prepare your own food as much as possible. If you do order takeout, open the bag, box or containers, then wash your hands. Lift, fork or spoon out the contents into your own dishes. After you dispose of these outside containers, wash your hands again. Most restaurants, gyms and public pools are closed; but even if one is open, now is not the time to go.

Here are some other things to avoid: playdates, parties, sleepovers, having friends or family over for meals or visits, and going to coffee shops — essentially any nonessential activity that involves close contact with others.

What can I do to keep my immune system strong?

Your immune system is your body's defense system. When a harmful invader — like a cold or flu virus, or the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 — gets into your body, your immune system mounts an attack. Known as an immune response, this attack is a sequence of events that involves various cells and unfolds over time.

Following general health guidelines is the best step you can take toward keeping your immune system strong and healthy. Every part of your body, including your immune system, functions better when protected from environmental assaults and bolstered by healthy-living strategies such as these:

  • Don't smoke or vape.

  • Eat a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

  • Take a multivitamin if you suspect that you may not be getting all the nutrients you need through your diet.

  • Exercise regularly.

  • Maintain a healthy weight.

  • Control your stress level.

  • Control your blood pressure.

  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation (no more than one to two drinks a day for men, no more than one a day for women).

  • Get enough sleep.

  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and trying not to touch your hands to your face, since harmful germs can enter through your eyes, nose, and mouth.

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(+63) 917 875 1000

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Leaders ICS is back in school! Administrative and academic staff are available during operating hours indicated below.

Monday to Friday - 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Lunch Break - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

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